Attention shoppers: You may now resume your regularly scheduled visits to big-box stores

OLD SOUTHERNER

Photo by Ben Schumin courtesy of http://commons.wikimedia.org/

Photo by Ben Schumin courtesy of http://commons.wikimedia.org/

By ANNE R. KEY
Special Contributor

If you refuse to join the green movement, then stick with me—the Old Southerner, who casts a wary eye at all this so-called sustainability stuff. I’m a straight talker, and I love writing about what pisses me off, especially when it comes to self-righteous do-gooders.

Now that the holidays are over, those of us who live in the monopolized, corporate-controlled outreaches of America can safely resume our regular shopping visits to the neighborhood big-box store.

Thankfully, the voices of anti-chain activists who rant about “buying local” seem to be fading as fast as my New Year’s resolutions. All those rich snoots have finally settled back into their little bubble-towns with their fancy boutiques and independent shops where a head of “artisan lettuce” runs about $5. I kid you not.

Hey, I’m not fond of farm subsidies either. I realize it takes precious time and money to grow and produce food. But I’m sick of this holier-than-thou attitude about my consumer habits. Some of us don’t have a choice when it comes to shopping. Hello, McFly? Not everyone lives in your little bubble world, and most people don’t earn the six figures you get from running your daddy’s hoity-toit day spa.

The only place within 30 miles of my home happens to be Walmart. I hate Walmart, okay? I know all about their abuses and how most of the crap they carry is imported from Communist China, manufactured in dormitory-style factories where “employees” live like prisoners.

But, look, I shop strategically. I’m not a villain or a communist or unpatriotic. What I’m saying is, yes, it is possible to have an ethics of consumption while shopping at a big-box store.

So if you ever need the advice, if you just might happen to be in my shoes one day—low-income rural Kentuckian with a family to clothe and feed—click here to check out my tips for shopping at a big-box store.


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3 comments

  1. How interesting …

    It’s one thing to disagree and to express a dissenting opinion, but it’s quite another to do so with such a judgemental tone. For me, any merit the piece may have had flew out the window with the words “rich snoots.” I’m neither rich nor snooty, and I buy local every time I can; I take my responsibility as consumer seriously. I think more people should. But I certainly don’t judge them if they choose not to.

    I’m not sure which the writer dislikes more: the Green Movement or the people who support it.

    Or maybe this is all tongue-in-cheek and I missed the joke?

  2. Glad, thanks for reading and commenting. Do you know who “Old Southerner” is? Read the column explanation, top right corner: “If you refuse to join the green movement, then stick with me—the Old Southerner, who casts a wary eye at all this so-called sustainability stuff. I’m a straight talker, and I love writing about what pisses me off, especially when it comes to self-righteous do-gooders.”

  3. But the name of this website is “new southerner” so maybe Glad was not expecting something that sounds so utterly redneck. I shop at Wal-Mart too and have never paid $5 for a head of lettuce, and do not like Al Gore, but even Wal-Mart is trying to be more environmentally responsible, or at least appear that way.
    It’s a shame that the writer of this article may never taste a real Arkansas strawberry. Walmart produce is pretty but often taste-free.

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